How to decipher EMC’s new VNX pre-announcement and look behind the marketing.

It was with interest that I watched some of EMC’s announcements during EMC World. Partly due to competitor awareness, and partly due to being an irrepressible nerd, hoping for something really cool.

BTW: Thanks to Mark Kulacz for assisting with the proof points. Mark, as much as it pains me to admit so, is quite possibly an even bigger nerd than I am.

So… EMC did deliver something. A demo of the possible successor to VNX (VNX2?), unavailable as of this writing (indeed, a lot of fuss was made about it being lab only etc).

Continue reading “How to decipher EMC’s new VNX pre-announcement and look behind the marketing.”

More EMC VNX caveats

Lately, when competing with VNX, I see EMC using several points to prove they’re superior (or at least not deficient).

I’d already written this article a while back, and today I want to explore a few aspects in more depth since my BS pain threshold is getting pretty low. The topics discussed:

  1. VNX space efficiency
  2. LUNs can be served by either controller for “load balancing”
  3. Claims that autotiering helps most workloads
  4. Claims that storage pools are easier
  5. Thin provisioning performance (this one’s interesting)
  6. The new VNX snapshots

References to actual EMC documentation will be used. Otherwise I’d also be no better than a marketing droid.

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Are you doing a disservice to your company with RFPs?

Whether we like it or not, RFPs (Request For Proposal) are a fact of life for vendors.

It usually works like this: A customer has a legitimate need for something. They decide (for whatever reason) to get bids from different vendors. They then craft an RFP document that is either:

  1. Carefully written, with the best intentions, so that they get the most detailed proposal possible given their requirements, or
  2. Carefully tailored by them and the help of their preferred vendor to box out the other vendors.

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NetApp posts great Cluster-Mode SPC-1 result

<Edited to add some more information on how SPC-1 works since there was some confusion based on the comments received>

We’ve been busy at NetApp… busy perfecting the industry’s only scale-out unified platform, among other things.

We’ve already released ONTAP 8.1, which, in Cluster-Mode, allows 24 nodes (each with up to 8TB cache) for NAS workloads, and 4 nodes for block workloads (FC and iSCSI).

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Interpreting $/IOPS and IOPS/RAID correctly for various RAID types

<Article updated with more accurate calculation>

There are some impressive new scores at storageperformance.org, with the usual crazy configurations of thousands of drives etc.

Regarding price/performance:

When looking at $/IOP, make sure you are comparing list price (look at the full disclosure report, that has all the details for each config).

Otherwise, you could get the wrong $/IOP since some vendors have list prices, others show heavy discounting.

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