Tag Archives: FUD

NetApp vs EMC usability report: malice, stupidity or both?

Most are familiar with Hanlon’s Razor:

Never attribute to malice that which is adequately explained by stupidity.

A variation of that is:

Never attribute to malice that which is adequately explained by stupidity, but don’t rule out malice.

You see, EMC sponsored a study comparing their systems to ones from the company they look up to and try to emulate. The report deals with ease-of-use (and I’ll be the first to admit the current iteration of EMC boxes is far easier to use than in the past and the GUI has some cool stuff in it). I was intrigued, but after reading the official-looking report posted by Chuck Hollis, I wondered who in their right mind will lend it credence, and ignored it since I have a real day job solving actual customer problems and can’t possibly respond to every piece of FUD I see (and I see a lot).

Today I’m sitting in a rather boring meeting so I thought I’d spend a few minutes to show how misguided the document is.

In essence, the document tackles the age-old dilemma of which race car to get by comparing how easy it is to change the oil, and completely ignores the “winning the race with said car” part. My question would be: “which car allows you to win the race more easily and with the least headaches, least cost and least effort?”

And if you think winning a “race” is just about performance, think again.

It is also interesting how the important aspects of efficiency, reliability and performance are not tackled, but I guess this is a “usability” report…

Strange that a company named “Strategic Focus” reduces itself to comparing arrays by measuring the number of mouse clicks. Not sure how this is strategic for customers. They were commissioned by EMC, so maybe EMC considers this strategic.

I’ll show how wrong the document is by pointing at just some of the more glaring issues, but I’ll start by saying a large multinational company has many PB of NetApp boxes around the globe and 3 relaxed guys to manage it all. How’s that for a real example? :)

  1. Page 2, section 4, “Methodology”: EMC’s own engineers set up the VNX properly. No mention of who did the NetApp testing, what their qualifications are, and so on. So, first question: “Do these people even know what they’re doing? Have they really used a NetApp system before?”
  2. Page 10, Table A, showing the configurations. A NetApp FAS3070 was used, running the latest code at this moment (8.01). Thanks EMC for the unintended compliment – you see, that system is 2 generations old (the current one is 3270 and the previous one is 3170) yet it can still run the very latest 64-bit ONTAP code just fine. What about the EMC CX3? Can it run FLARE31? Or is that a forklift upgrade? Something to be said for investment protection :)
  3. Page 3 table 5-1, #1. Storage pools on all modern arrays would typically be created upfront, so the wording is very misleading. In order to create a new LUN one does NOT NEED to create a pool. Same goes for all vendors.
  4. Same table and section (also mentioned in section 7): Figuring out the space available is as simple as going to the aggregate page, where the space is clearly shown for the aggregates. So, unsure what is meant here.
  5. Regarding LUN creation… Let me ask you a question: After you create a LUN on any array, what do you need to do next? You see, the goal is to attach the LUN to a host, do alignment, partition creation, multipathing and create a filesystem and write stuff to it. You know, use it. NetApp largely automates end-to-end creation of host filesystems and, indeed, does not need an administrator to create a LUN on the array at all. Clearly the person doing the testing is either not aware of this or decided to omit this fact.
  6. Page 4, item 4 (thin provisioning). Asinine statement – plus, any NetApp LUN can be made thick or thin with a single click, whereas a VNX needs to do a migration. Indeed, NetApp does not complicate things whether thin or thick is required, does not differentiate between thin and thick when writing, and therefore does not incur a performance penalty, whereas EMC does (according to EMC documentation).
  7. Page 4, item 5 (Creation of virtual CIFS servers). The Multistore feature is free of charge on all new systems and allows one to create fully segregated, secure multitenancy virtual CIFS, NFS and iSCSI NetApp “partitions” – far beyond the capabilities of EMC. Again, misleading.
  8. Page 4, item 6 (growing storage elements). No measurable difference? Kindly show all the steps to grow a LUN until the new space is visible from the host side. End-to-end is important to real users since they want to use the storage. Or maybe not, for the authors of this document.
  9. Page 5, Item 1. We are really talking here about EMC snapshots? Seriously? Versus NetApp? To earn the right to do so assumes your snapshots are a usable and decent feature and that you can take a good number of them without the box crumbling to pieces. Ask any vendor about a production array with the most snaps and ask to talk to the customer using it. Then compare the number of snaps to a typical NetApp customer’s. Don’t be surprised if one number is a few hundred times less than the other.
  10. Page 5, item 3 (storage tiering): part of a longer conversation but this assumes all arrays need to do tiering. If my solution is optimized to the level that it doesn’t need to do this but yours is not optimized so it needs tiering, why on earth am I being penalized for doing storage more efficiently than you? (AKA the “not invented here” syndrome).
  11. Page 6 item 1 (VMware awareness): NetApp puts all the awareness inside vCenter and, indeed, datastore creation (including volume/LUN/NAS creation and resizing), VM cloning etc. all from within vCenter itself. Ask for a demo and prepare to be amazed.
  12. Page 6, item 2 – (dedupe/compress individual VMs): This one had my blood boiling. You see, EMC cannot even dedupe individual VMs, (impossible, given the fact that current DART code only does dedupe at the file and not block level and no two active VMs will ever be exactly the same), can’t dedupe at all for block storage (maybe in the future but not today), and in general doesn’t recommend compression for VMs! Ask to see the best practices guide that states all this is supported and recommended for active production VMs, and to talk to a customer doing it at scale (not 10 VMs). A feature you can theoretically turn on but that will never work is not quite useful, you see…
  13. Page 8, entire table: Too much to comment on, suffice it to say that NetApp systems come with tools not mentioned in this report that go so far beyond what Unisphere does that it’s not even funny (at no additional cost). Used by customers that have thousands of NetApp systems. That’s how much those tools scale. EMC would need vast portions of the Ionix suite to do anything remotely similar (at $$$). Of course, mentioning that would kinda derail this document… and the piece about support and upgrades is utterly wrong, but I like to keep the surprise for when I do the demos and not share cool IP ideas here :)
  14. Page 11, Table B1: In the end, the funniest one of all! If you add up the total number of mouse clicks, NetApp needed 92 vs EMC’s 111. Since the whole point of this usability report is to show overall ease of use by measuring the total number of clicks to do stuff, it’s interesting that they didn’t do a simple total to show who won in the end… :)

I could keep going but I need to pay attention to my meeting now since it suddenly became interesting.

Ultimately, when it comes to ease of use, it’s simple to just do a demo and have the customer decide for themselves which approach they like best. Documents such as this one mean less than nothing for actual end users.

I should have another similar list showing clicks and TIME needed to do certain other things. For instance, using RecoverPoint (or any other method), kindly show the number of clicks and time (and disk space) for creating 30 writable clones of a 10TB SQL DB and mounting them on 30 different DB servers simultaneously. Maintaining unique instance names etc. Kinda goes a bit beyond LUN creation, doesn’t it? :)

All this BTW doesn’t mean any vendor should rest on their laurels and stop working on improving usability. It’s a never-ending quest. Just stop it with the FUD, please…

Finishing with something funny: Check this video for a good demonstration of something needing few clicks yet not being that easy to do.

Comments welcome.

D

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